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Psychology

 

Year 9

What will pupils study this year?

Edexcel GCSE Single Award (Year 1 of a 3 year delivery model)

The Edexcel GCSE in Psychology qualification comprises of two units. Both these units are assessed through external examination during the summer term of year 11. The exam paper for Unit 1 (Development, Memory, Psychological Problems, The Brain & Neuropsychology and Social Influence) consists of multiple-choice,  short-answer and long-answer questions and the result contributes 55% of the total grade for the full GCSE. The exam paper for Unit 2 comprises of questions from two optional topics fro a selection of 5 topics, plus questions on Research Methods and Mathematical Skills. The optional topics cover issues from; Criminal Psychology, The Self, Perception, Sleep & Dreaming & Language, Thought & Communication. Paper two consists of multiple choice questions, short answers and a wide range of extended writing and the result contributes 45% of the total grade for the full GCSE.  

The focus is on the process of psychology and its application in today’s world. The units contain key psychological questions with key terms, issues and debates, practical aspects including the research of psychologists and the research students can undertake, and the relevance of issues to the world.

 

 

 Autumn Term

 Areas of study include:

 What is Psychology? | Developmental Stages | Piaget's Developmental Theory | Piaget's Theory Including Evaluation of Theory | Ethical Issues of Research | Piaget and Inhelder Study (1956) | Observation, Correlation Drawing and Interpreting Scatterplots | Dweck's Mindset Theory | Study: Gunderson et al. (2013) | Willingham's Learning Theory of Development | Evaluation of Theory | Moral Development | Memory | Stages of Memory Including Short and Long Term

 Spring Term

 Students will learn about:

 The Multi-store Model of Memory | Study: Peterson and Peterson (1959) | Bar Charts and Histograms | Experiments as a Research Method | Designing Studies: Independent Groups, Repeated Measures, Matched Pairs | Bartlett's Theory of Reconstructive Memory | Study: Bartlett's (1932) War of the Ghosts | Amnesia | Reductionism and Holism | Psychological Problems: IIntroduction to Mental Health Issues, Depression and Addiction, Description of Symptoms | Diagnosis of International Classification of Diseases (ICD)

 Summer Term

 Students will learn about:

 Depression: Genetic Explanation | Depression: Cognitive Explanation | Study: Caspi et al. (2003) | Writing Hypotheses | Addiction: Genetic Explanation | Addiction: Learning Explanation

 Students will then undertake a programme of revision in preparation for the end-of-year examinations.

 

Year 10

What will pupils study this year?

Edexcel GCSE Single Award (Year 2 of a 3 year delivery model)

 

 

 

 Autumn Term

 There will be a review of the course so far before moving on to other areas of study. These will include:

 Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) | Drug treatments | Study: Young (2007) | Nature vs Nurture issues | The brain and neuropsychology | Synapses and neurotransmitters | Brain lateralisation | Study: Sperry (1968) | Neurological damage and its effects | The case study method

 Spring Term

 Students will learn about:

 Study: Damsio et al. (1994) | Historical perspectives | Social influence | Factors affecting bystander behaviour | Study: Pillavin et al. (1969) | Conformity | Study: Zimbardo's prison experiment (1973) | Qualitative and quantitative data | Sampling | Mean, median, mode and range

 Summer Term

 Students will learn about:

 Obedience | Behaviour of crowds | Blind obedience | Cultural, social, personal and situational factors

 Students will then undertake a programme of revision in preparation for the end-of-year examinations.

 

Year 11

What will pupils study this year?

Edexcel GCSE Single Award (Year 3 of a 3 year delivery model)

Students will choose two topics to study for the year from the below table;

 

 

 Criminal

 Areas of study include:

 WOperant conditioning | Social learning theory | Study: Bandura, Ross and Ross (1961) | Study: Charlton et al. (2000) | Biological explanation of criminality | Punishment and recidivism | Treating offenders

 The Self

 Students will learn about:

 Self concept (Lewis) | Rogers Study: Van Houtte and Jarvis (1995) | Erikson, Baumeister | Study: Vohs and Schooler (2008) | Humanistic explanation of self (Mascow and Rogers)  | External and internal factors | Measuring personality | Trait theories of personality

 Perception

 This topic consists of;

 Monocular and binocular cues | Illusions and constancies | Study: Haber and Levin (2001) | Gregory's theory | Gibson's theory | Perceptual set | Study: Carmichael at al. (1932)

 Sleep and Dreaming

 Areas of study include:

 Function of sleep | Internal and external factors affecting sleep | Study: Siffre (1975) | Sleep disorders | Freud's theory of dreaming | Study: Freud's Little Hans (1909) | Hobson and MacCarley's theory

 Language, Thought and Communication

 Students will learn about:

 DLanguage-thought issues | Plaget | Vygotsky | Language relativism and language determinism | Study: Boroditsky (2001) | Aitchison's criteria | Darwinian view of non-verbal communication (NVC) | Study: Yuki et al. (2007)

 

Year 11

What will pupils study this year?

Edexcel GCSE Single Award (one year delivery)

The Edexcel GCSE in Psychology qualification comprises of two units. Both these units are assessed through external examination during the summer term of year 11. The exam paper for Unit 1 (Perception and Dreaming) consists of multiple-choice and short-answer questions and the result contributes 40% of the total grade for the full GCSE. The exam paper for Unit 2 (Social and Biological Psychological Debates) consists of multiple choice questions, short answers and some extended writing and the result contributes 60% of the total grade for the full GCSE.

The focus is on the process of psychology and its application in today’s world. The units contain key psychological questions with key terms, practical aspects including the research of psychologists and the research students can undertake, and the relevance of issues to the world.

 

 

 Autumn Term

 Unit 1 Topic A: How do we see our world?

 Students will learn about:

  • The biological structures involved in perception: including the role of the eye (retina, rods, cones, optic nerve, blind spot) and the brain (-optic chiasma, visual cortex)
  • Cues to depth: superimposition, relative size, linear perspective, stereopsis, texture gradient, height in the plane; and size constancy
  • Gestalt laws: figure-ground, continuity, proximity, similarity, closure
  • Visual illusions: fictions (colour after-effects and illusory contours), ambiguous figures (Necker cube and Leeper’s lady), distortions (Muller-Lyer and Ponzo),
  • Explanations of illusions (Gestalt theory and Gregory’s work on perspective theory), including evaluation of each
  • The influence of schemas on how we interpret our world and evaluation of such influence drawing on Palmer (1975), Bartlett (1932) and Carmichael, Hogan and Walter (1932). 

 Unit 1 Topic B: Is dreaming meaningful?

 Students will learn about:

  • Freud’s (1900) dream theory including the concepts of manifest content, latent content and dreamwork (displacement, condensation and secondary elaboration), and their evaluation of the theory
  • The basic structure and function of a neuron: axon, impulse, neurotransmitter, synaptic transmission
  • Hobson and McCarley’s (1977) activation-synthesis model including the concepts of random activation, sensory blockade and movement inhibition
  • Explanations of dreaming offered by Freud, and Hobson and McCarley, by comparing and evaluating them.

 Assessment: There will be subject specific end of topic assessments using past paper questions at the end of term. Students will continually revisit topics in order to ensure that they remember the content in preparation for thier final exams.

 Spring Term

 Unit 2 Topic C: Do TV and video games affect young people’s behaviour?

 Students will learn about:

  • The causes of aggression including: biological (limbic system and amygdala, hormones) and social learning including from TV and video games (Social Learning Theory: role models, vicarious reinforcement, modelling, observational learning, identification)
  • Biological and social learning explanations of aggression by comparing them, including an evaluation of each
  • The nature-nurture debate in relation to understanding aggression
  • The evidence for individual differences in aggression drawing on Ramirez et al (2001) and Anderson and Dill (2000).
  • The effects of television on aggression using the findings (results and/or conclusions) of Charlton et al’s (2000) study and Williams’ (1981) study; including comparing them
  • The role of an educational psychologist. 

 Unit 2 Topic D: Why do we have phobias?

 Students will learn about: 

  • Causes of phobias including the evolutionary explanation of preparedness, Social Learning Theory (modelling and vicarious reinforcement) and classical/Pavlovian conditioning (association and generalisation)
  • The nature-nurture debate in relation to understanding phobias
  • Questionnaires as a research method including evaluation
  • Ethical issues of laboratory experiments using animals including social isolation, number and choice of species
  • Practical issues of laboratory experiments using animals including three practical issues 
  • The aims, procedures and findings (results and/or conclusions) and evaluation of Cover-Jones (1924) The case of Little Peter, Bennett-Levy and Marteau (1984) Fear of animals. What is prepared?
  • Flooding and systematic desensitisation as therapies used to treat phobias
  • The ethics of flooding and systematic desensitisation as therapies used to treat phobias, including the guidelines of distress and right to withdraw.

 Assessment: There will be subject specific end of topic assessments using past paper questions at the end of term. Students will continually revisit topics in order to ensure that they remember the content in preparation for thier final exams.

 Summer Term

 Unit 2 Topic E: Are criminals born or made?

 Students will learn about:

  • The causes of criminal behaviour including: biological explanations of criminality (genetics, XYY chromosome abnormality, twin studies) and social explanations of criminality (family patterns, childrearing strategies, self-fulfilling prophecy)
  • Biological and social explanations of criminality, by comparing them
  • The nature-nurture debate in relation to an individual’s tendency toward criminality.
  • The aim, procedure and findings and evaluation of Sigall and Ostrove (1975) Beautiful but dangerous: Effects of offender attractiveness and nature of the crime on juridic judgments, Madon et al (2004) Self-fulfilling prophecies: the synergistic, accumulative effect of parents’ beliefs on children’s drinking behaviour and Theilgaard (1984) A psychological study of the personalities of XYY- and XXY
  • The purpose, process and effectiveness of offender profiling as a method used to help catch criminals
  • The use of offender profiling in the case of John Duffy (David Canter)
  • The role of a forensic psychologist

 Data and explanations:

  • Analysis and evaluation of qualitative and quantitative data
  • Interpretation of data to provide evidence for testing ideas and developing theories
  • Explanations of behaviour by developing and using scientific theories and models.

 Investigation and enquiry:

  • Planning to conduct a psychological investigation and structure a hypothesis
  • Evaluating design and ethical implications of psychological enquiry.

 Evaluative and interpretative skills:

  • Recalling, analysing, interpreting, applying and questioning information or ideas
  • Presenting information
  • Developing arguments and drawing conclusions, using psychological concepts, terminology and conventions.

 Applications and implications of psychology:

  • The use of contemporary psychological developments and their benefits and drawbacks,
  • How psychological knowledge and ideas change over time
  • Appreciation of the implications of culture in psychological enquiry.

 Assessment: There will be subject specific end of topic assessments using past paper questions at the end of term. Students will continually revisit topics in order to ensure that they remember the content in preparation for thier final exams.