Hathershaw College

Understanding Your Child's Report

Understanding Your Child's Report

  

How will my child know if they are on track to make good progress?

Regular reports home will show your child’s Progress and their Attitude to Learning in four main areas; behaviour, effort, homework and punctuality to lesson.

At The Hathershaw College, Key Stage 3 includes Years 7, 8 and 9, while Key Stage 4 includes Years 10 and 11. However, we have adopted a five year learning journey spanning across Year 7 to Year 11. We have allocated each student a KS3 Starting Pathway based on their progress at primary school. This in turn is used to provide an indication of a range of grades, that as a minimum, they should be aiming to achieve by the end of Year 11. We have called these range of grades, GCSE Destination Grade Bands.  If your child makes exceptional progress, it is possible for them to move up to a different band.

KS3 Starting Pathway

GCSE Destination Grade Band

Ambition

7/8/9

Courage

5/6

Endurance

3/4

Resilience

1/2

 

Progress

 

At KS3

A student’s progress is reported as a word as outlined below.  Teachers have made this decision based on classwork, homework and other assessments, comparing the quality of these against your child’s starting pathway and where they should be at the end of Year 11.

Above - They are currently making excellent progress on their starting pathway. If they continue, they could achieve higher than their destination grade bands by the end of Key Stage 4. If your child continues to make such good progress in most of their subjects, we might consider moving them up to a higher pathway.

On track - They are currently making expected progress on their starting pathway. If they continue, they are likely to achieve their destination grade bands at the end of Key Stage 4.

Below - They are currently underachieving and not achieving in line with expectations. If they continue, they are likely to achieve below their destination grade bands by the end of Key Stage 4. If your child’s attitude to learning is lower than it should be, this might be the reason for them not making the progress they should. 

At KS4

A student’s progress is measured by giving a target grade and a predicted grade.

A target grade is based on your child’s progress at primary school, they have been given a target grade for each subject which, as a minimum, they should be aiming to achieve by the end of Year 11.

A predicted grade is the grade your son/daughter is most likely to achieve by the end of the Year 11 based on their current performance. Teachers have made this decision based on classwork, homework and other assessments.

 

Attitude to Learning Grading System

At both Key Stages all students will be assessed on their Attitude to Learning across four main areas; behaviour, effort, homework and punctuality to lesson.

The following chart defines the high standard we want all students to aim for. We believe that great learning happens when students challenge themselves to work hard and aim high.

 

Attitude to Learning

Behaviour in lesson

Effort in lesson

Homework submission

Quality of Homework

Punctuality to lesson

A Always very well behaved and ready to learn. Excellent class contributions and organisation. Always takes responsibility for own learning in an attempt to make outstanding progress. Always handed in on time. Homework is always at the expected level to further learning. Always on time to lesson.
B Mostly well behaved and ready to learn. Mostly makes a good contribution in class. Mostly takes responsibility for own learning in an attempt to make good progress. Mostly handed in on time. Homework is mostly completed and/or can sometimes be below what is expected to further learning. Mostly on time to lesson.
C Behaviour is a concern and is hindering progress.

Sometimes needs re-focusing from teacher through warnings or prompts.

Poor effort in their written and/or very little contribution in class.

Often handed in late or not handed in at all. Homework is consistently below what is expected (bare minimum). Sometimes on time to lesson.

 

Changes to Assessment and GCSE Grading

The GCSEs in England have changed to make them more demanding. These new GCSEs are better at equipping young people with the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in 21st century Britain, and match the best performing education systems in the world.

The new qualifications are the result of a long and careful process of reform, which involved extensive consultation with schools, universities and employers.

GCSEs have changed gradually over the past few years:

  • In the summer of 2017, the first reformed GCSEs were introduced in English language, English literature and maths.
  • In 2018, a further 20 new GCSE subjects were introduced. These included sciences, history and geography, and some modern foreign languages.
  • In 2019, a further 25 new GCSEs were examined for the first time.
  • By 2020, all GCSEs in England are now graded using numbers instead of letters. 

 

How has the grading scale changed?

The grading scale now runs from 9 to 1 instead of A* to G, with 9 the highest grade.

The new scale recognises more clearly the achievements of high-attaining students, as the additional grades allow for greater differentiation. 

The new GCSE grading scale is not directly equivalent to the old A* to G one. However, there are some comparable points between the old grades and the new ones:

  • The bottom of grade 7 is aligned with the bottom of grade A
  • The bottom of grade 4 is aligned with the bottom of grade C
  • The bottom of grade 1 is aligned with the bottom of grade G 

 

What is a “standard” or “strong” pass?

  • A Grade 4 is the “standard pass”, in all subjects. A grade 4 or above marks a similar achievement to the old grade C or above.
  • Students who do not attain a grade 4 or above in English and/or maths must continue to study these subjects as part of their post-16 education. This requirement does not apply to other subjects.
  • A grade 5 or above in English or maths is known as a “strong pass” for the purposes of school accountability only. It is part of the way in which we monitor school performance, helping us to raise standards in English and maths. 


Secondary School Accountability – The Progress 8 measure

Historically, all students and schools were measured on attainment by how many GCSEs they achieve at A*-C including English and Mathematics. From September 2016 all students are measured on how much progress they make from when they start in Year 7 to when they complete their exams at the end of Year 11. This is known as Progress 8. 

This measure is based on students’ progress measured across eight subjects. For each student the 8 subjects must be a combination from the diagram, below.

...and finally

We care deeply about the personal development of each of our students. From the moment a child enters the College we want them to feel a sense of happiness and belonging, and be challenged to do their very best. 

Our assessment system aims to set the highest aspirations and encourage all students to achieve their full potential.